bonniegrrl:

Director John Hughes explains the [really wonderful] museum scene from Ferris Bueller’s Day Off!

austinkleon:


Vivian Maier self-portraits
@mattthomas:

Vivian Maier’s selfie game was untouchable

austinkleon:


Vivian Maier self-portraits
@mattthomas:

Vivian Maier’s selfie game was untouchable

austinkleon:


Vivian Maier self-portraits
@mattthomas:

Vivian Maier’s selfie game was untouchable

austinkleon:


Vivian Maier self-portraits
@mattthomas:

Vivian Maier’s selfie game was untouchable

explore-blog:

Australian generative artist and designer Jonathan McCabe turns Alan Turing’s theory of naturally occurring patterns in cells into hypnotic artworks. Pair with artist Michele Banks’s cellular paintings inspired by Carl Sagan.

nprmusic:

We sent Yo-Yo Ma and many of his close friends from all over the world to a theatrical props warehouse in Brooklyn to jam and it is ridiculous. 
nprmusic:

We sent Yo-Yo Ma and many of his close friends from all over the world to a theatrical props warehouse in Brooklyn to jam and it is ridiculous. 
nprmusic:

We sent Yo-Yo Ma and many of his close friends from all over the world to a theatrical props warehouse in Brooklyn to jam and it is ridiculous. 

nprmusic:

We sent Yo-Yo Ma and many of his close friends from all over the world to a theatrical props warehouse in Brooklyn to jam and it is ridiculous

(via npr)

nprmusic:

nprcodeswitch:

The word swagger should be a familiar term to anyone who has listened to popular hip-hop songs in recent years; a recent search on Rap Genius turned up more than a thousand songs that used the word in the lyrics.

Given those stats, you’d be forgiven for thinking “swagger” is a relatively new concept, but it can be traced all the way back to Elizabethan England. As with so many other famous words and phrases, the first writer to use it was William Shakespeare. The playwright first had the “shrewd and knavish sprite” Puck use it in this monologue in A Midsummer Night’s Dream:

What hempen home-spuns have we swaggering here,

So near the cradle of the fairy queen?

Read more about the history of “swagger” on NPR’s Code Switch.

SWAG.

likeafieldmouse:

Marcel Duchamp - Mile of String (1942)

"Duchamp’s experiments with space and display continued when, after the exodus of many of the Surrealists out of Europe during WWII, Andre Breton called on him to install the first international Surrealist exhibition in the United States.

Titled First Papers of Surrealism after the application papers that most of the émigré artists faced upon entry into the US, the show was held in 1942 at the Whitelaw Reid mansion in New York as a benefit affair for the French Relief Societies.

Having acquired sixteen miles of ordinary white string for the installation, the artist engaged the help of several friends to erect a criss-crossed webbing (in the end, using only a fraction of his overzealous purchase). 

The twine traversed the mansion’s former drawing rooms, filled for the exhibition with paintings hung on portable display partitions (paintings being the overwhelming majority of what was on show).

The tangled mesh did not cut off vision completely (it was the frustration, not the elimination of sight that Duchamp desired); nevertheless, the entwinement between and in front of so many of the things ‘on display’ constituted a decided barrier between the spectator and the works of art.”

(via soulpancake)

themarysue:

kateordie:

riansygh:

Mar 5th Today I witnessed something amazing. Almost in stark contrast to yesterday, today I saw tangible impact of lady-representation in comics.
At the bookstore I work at, we have a dedicated Adventure Time section. This family came in and those kids were SO EXCITED to see their favourite characters in comics. I talked them through each OGN and series compilation, explaining what they all were and in what order they should be read, and this little girl’s entire life was changed. You could see it on her face.
The moment I mentioned Kate Leth (and that, yes, she is a girl.) this little girl’s face lit up like Christmas morning. I don’t know if it just never occurred to her that girls can work in comics but the excitement and wonder that left the store in her was a privilege to see. I ended up selling them the Fionna & Cake’s, all the OGN’s, and an AT doodle book. She left begging her dad to help her learn how to draw Marceline comics. (And he was happy to comply!)
Kate Leth has left an everlasting impression on this little girl just by existing and working in the industry. I honestly hope to someday be able to see such an impact on someone from my own work. Ladies in comics is important. The representation on the page, and behind them, is important. Having a reflection of yourself in the content you enjoy is important. I hope that little girl grows up to be a famous comic author someday.
It was a very good day.

I don’t even know what to say, I think my heart exploded. This is, I think, the best response I could ever hope for.
Thank you.

I’M NOT CRYING YOU’RE CRYING themarysue:

kateordie:

riansygh:

Mar 5th Today I witnessed something amazing. Almost in stark contrast to yesterday, today I saw tangible impact of lady-representation in comics.
At the bookstore I work at, we have a dedicated Adventure Time section. This family came in and those kids were SO EXCITED to see their favourite characters in comics. I talked them through each OGN and series compilation, explaining what they all were and in what order they should be read, and this little girl’s entire life was changed. You could see it on her face.
The moment I mentioned Kate Leth (and that, yes, she is a girl.) this little girl’s face lit up like Christmas morning. I don’t know if it just never occurred to her that girls can work in comics but the excitement and wonder that left the store in her was a privilege to see. I ended up selling them the Fionna & Cake’s, all the OGN’s, and an AT doodle book. She left begging her dad to help her learn how to draw Marceline comics. (And he was happy to comply!)
Kate Leth has left an everlasting impression on this little girl just by existing and working in the industry. I honestly hope to someday be able to see such an impact on someone from my own work. Ladies in comics is important. The representation on the page, and behind them, is important. Having a reflection of yourself in the content you enjoy is important. I hope that little girl grows up to be a famous comic author someday.
It was a very good day.

I don’t even know what to say, I think my heart exploded. This is, I think, the best response I could ever hope for.
Thank you.

I’M NOT CRYING YOU’RE CRYING themarysue:

kateordie:

riansygh:

Mar 5th Today I witnessed something amazing. Almost in stark contrast to yesterday, today I saw tangible impact of lady-representation in comics.
At the bookstore I work at, we have a dedicated Adventure Time section. This family came in and those kids were SO EXCITED to see their favourite characters in comics. I talked them through each OGN and series compilation, explaining what they all were and in what order they should be read, and this little girl’s entire life was changed. You could see it on her face.
The moment I mentioned Kate Leth (and that, yes, she is a girl.) this little girl’s face lit up like Christmas morning. I don’t know if it just never occurred to her that girls can work in comics but the excitement and wonder that left the store in her was a privilege to see. I ended up selling them the Fionna & Cake’s, all the OGN’s, and an AT doodle book. She left begging her dad to help her learn how to draw Marceline comics. (And he was happy to comply!)
Kate Leth has left an everlasting impression on this little girl just by existing and working in the industry. I honestly hope to someday be able to see such an impact on someone from my own work. Ladies in comics is important. The representation on the page, and behind them, is important. Having a reflection of yourself in the content you enjoy is important. I hope that little girl grows up to be a famous comic author someday.
It was a very good day.

I don’t even know what to say, I think my heart exploded. This is, I think, the best response I could ever hope for.
Thank you.

I’M NOT CRYING YOU’RE CRYING themarysue:

kateordie:

riansygh:

Mar 5th Today I witnessed something amazing. Almost in stark contrast to yesterday, today I saw tangible impact of lady-representation in comics.
At the bookstore I work at, we have a dedicated Adventure Time section. This family came in and those kids were SO EXCITED to see their favourite characters in comics. I talked them through each OGN and series compilation, explaining what they all were and in what order they should be read, and this little girl’s entire life was changed. You could see it on her face.
The moment I mentioned Kate Leth (and that, yes, she is a girl.) this little girl’s face lit up like Christmas morning. I don’t know if it just never occurred to her that girls can work in comics but the excitement and wonder that left the store in her was a privilege to see. I ended up selling them the Fionna & Cake’s, all the OGN’s, and an AT doodle book. She left begging her dad to help her learn how to draw Marceline comics. (And he was happy to comply!)
Kate Leth has left an everlasting impression on this little girl just by existing and working in the industry. I honestly hope to someday be able to see such an impact on someone from my own work. Ladies in comics is important. The representation on the page, and behind them, is important. Having a reflection of yourself in the content you enjoy is important. I hope that little girl grows up to be a famous comic author someday.
It was a very good day.

I don’t even know what to say, I think my heart exploded. This is, I think, the best response I could ever hope for.
Thank you.

I’M NOT CRYING YOU’RE CRYING

themarysue:

kateordie:

riansygh:

Mar 5th
Today I witnessed something amazing. Almost in stark contrast to yesterday, today I saw tangible impact of lady-representation in comics.

At the bookstore I work at, we have a dedicated Adventure Time section. This family came in and those kids were SO EXCITED to see their favourite characters in comics. I talked them through each OGN and series compilation, explaining what they all were and in what order they should be read, and this little girl’s entire life was changed. You could see it on her face.

The moment I mentioned Kate Leth (and that, yes, she is a girl.) this little girl’s face lit up like Christmas morning. I don’t know if it just never occurred to her that girls can work in comics but the excitement and wonder that left the store in her was a privilege to see. I ended up selling them the Fionna & Cake’s, all the OGN’s, and an AT doodle book. She left begging her dad to help her learn how to draw Marceline comics. (And he was happy to comply!)

Kate Leth has left an everlasting impression on this little girl just by existing and working in the industry. I honestly hope to someday be able to see such an impact on someone from my own work. Ladies in comics is important. The representation on the page, and behind them, is important. Having a reflection of yourself in the content you enjoy is important. I hope that little girl grows up to be a famous comic author someday.

It was a very good day.

I don’t even know what to say, I think my heart exploded. This is, I think, the best response I could ever hope for.

Thank you.

I’M NOT CRYING YOU’RE CRYING