Le Saut dans le vide (Leap into the Void); Photomontage by Shunk Kender of a performance by Yves Klein at Rue Gentil-Bernard, Fontenay-aux-Roses, October 1960.

  Le Saut dans le vide (Leap into the Void); Photomontage by Shunk Kender of a performance by Yves Klein at Rue Gentil-Bernard, Fontenay-aux-Roses, October 1960.

Le Saut dans le vide (Leap into the Void); Photomontage by Shunk Kender of a performance by Yves Klein at Rue Gentil-Bernard, Fontenay-aux-Roses, October 1960.

anuvia:

thatonenarga:


Aang deals with cultural appropriation - (x)


People need to stop reblogging this without the rest of the comic :^)

Part 1: Aang has a negative reaction to people who mistakenly hurt his feelings but had good intentions.
Part 2: Aang calms down and acknowledges that those people’s intentions were good and instead of being upset offers to educate and inform those people and SHARES his culture.
Good message there.
anuvia:

thatonenarga:


Aang deals with cultural appropriation - (x)


People need to stop reblogging this without the rest of the comic :^)

Part 1: Aang has a negative reaction to people who mistakenly hurt his feelings but had good intentions.
Part 2: Aang calms down and acknowledges that those people’s intentions were good and instead of being upset offers to educate and inform those people and SHARES his culture.
Good message there.
anuvia:

thatonenarga:


Aang deals with cultural appropriation - (x)


People need to stop reblogging this without the rest of the comic :^)

Part 1: Aang has a negative reaction to people who mistakenly hurt his feelings but had good intentions.
Part 2: Aang calms down and acknowledges that those people’s intentions were good and instead of being upset offers to educate and inform those people and SHARES his culture.
Good message there.

anuvia:

thatonenarga:

Aang deals with cultural appropriation - (x)

People need to stop reblogging this without the rest of the comic :^)

Part 1: Aang has a negative reaction to people who mistakenly hurt his feelings but had good intentions.

Part 2: Aang calms down and acknowledges that those people’s intentions were good and instead of being upset offers to educate and inform those people and SHARES his culture.

Good message there.

(via themarysue)

neil-gaiman:

geekynerfherder:

Various cover art for 'Neverwhere' by Neil Gaiman, released on this day in 1996.

My book can now drink legally in the UK and Australia…
neil-gaiman:

geekynerfherder:

Various cover art for 'Neverwhere' by Neil Gaiman, released on this day in 1996.

My book can now drink legally in the UK and Australia…
neil-gaiman:

geekynerfherder:

Various cover art for 'Neverwhere' by Neil Gaiman, released on this day in 1996.

My book can now drink legally in the UK and Australia…
neil-gaiman:

geekynerfherder:

Various cover art for 'Neverwhere' by Neil Gaiman, released on this day in 1996.

My book can now drink legally in the UK and Australia…
neil-gaiman:

geekynerfherder:

Various cover art for 'Neverwhere' by Neil Gaiman, released on this day in 1996.

My book can now drink legally in the UK and Australia…
neil-gaiman:

geekynerfherder:

Various cover art for 'Neverwhere' by Neil Gaiman, released on this day in 1996.

My book can now drink legally in the UK and Australia…

neil-gaiman:

geekynerfherder:

Various cover art for 'Neverwhere' by Neil Gaiman, released on this day in 1996.

My book can now drink legally in the UK and Australia…

explore-blog:

When photographer John William Keedy was diagnosed with an anxiety disorder — arguably the defining psychic malady of our era, and something that paralyzed even Darwin — he began documenting his experience in a moving photo series, an unusual and remarkable manifestation of the link between creativity and mental illness.  explore-blog:

When photographer John William Keedy was diagnosed with an anxiety disorder — arguably the defining psychic malady of our era, and something that paralyzed even Darwin — he began documenting his experience in a moving photo series, an unusual and remarkable manifestation of the link between creativity and mental illness.  explore-blog:

When photographer John William Keedy was diagnosed with an anxiety disorder — arguably the defining psychic malady of our era, and something that paralyzed even Darwin — he began documenting his experience in a moving photo series, an unusual and remarkable manifestation of the link between creativity and mental illness. 

explore-blog:

When photographer John William Keedy was diagnosed with an anxiety disorder — arguably the defining psychic malady of our era, and something that paralyzed even Darwin — he began documenting his experience in a moving photo series, an unusual and remarkable manifestation of the link between creativity and mental illness

rediscoveredbooks:

Our Birthday is only 2 days away! Come celebrate with us on September 6th with cake, puppet theater, face painting, and 25% off EVERYTHING! 
Visit the event page for a full schedule. You don’t want to miss it! 

rediscoveredbooks:

Our Birthday is only 2 days away! Come celebrate with us on September 6th with cake, puppet theater, face painting, and 25% off EVERYTHING!

Visit the event page for a full schedule. You don’t want to miss it! 

So many times, we make decisions about who we are – who we want to be, who we aspire to be, what we aspire to do – based on what we believe are our own self-imposed limitations, not those of the world. And we live inside those self-imposed limitations, without any sense that we can actually expand [them] if we let ourselves.

[…]

I don’t think it’s a matter of overcoming [our] fears — fears are fears, and we have a reptilian brain which we can’t simply turn on and turn off… It is critical to live despite those fears – if you’re waiting for the fears to go away, they’re not. You have to make a decision that you want [what you want] more than you want to be held back or self-protected by those fears.

explore-blog:

New study looks at what children’s drawings at age 4 reveal about their future thinking skills:

Researchers from King’s College London enlisted 7,700 pairs of 4-year-old identical and fraternal twins in England to draw pictures of a child. The researchers scored each drawing on a scale of 0 to 12, based on how many body parts were included. All the kids also took verbal and nonverbal intelligence tests at 4 and 14.

Kids with higher drawing scores tended to do better on the intelligence tests, though the two were only moderately linked.

Of course, one major limitation is that the study seems to conflate accuracy with intelligence, an approach that reflects our culture’s persistently narrow definition of intelligence and a failure to account for all the other realms of ability in Howard Gardner’s pioneering Theory of Multiple Intelligences. Perhaps kids who are less accurate but display a higher degree of abstract thought would end up more gifted in fields rely on symbolism and metaphorical thinking, from writing to painting. 

Granted, the researchers seem to be aware of this shortcoming. NPR reports:

[The researchers] are trying to figure out whether judging the children’s art in some other way (maybe based on creativity instead of accuracy) would reveal something different about their intelligence.