thenearsightedmonkey:

Dear Students,
This just in from sharp-eyed Smiley Bone.
In 1947, ten cartoonists drew their characters blind-folded. Can you dig it? Wanna try it?
Read more here…. thenearsightedmonkey:

Dear Students,
This just in from sharp-eyed Smiley Bone.
In 1947, ten cartoonists drew their characters blind-folded. Can you dig it? Wanna try it?
Read more here…. thenearsightedmonkey:

Dear Students,
This just in from sharp-eyed Smiley Bone.
In 1947, ten cartoonists drew their characters blind-folded. Can you dig it? Wanna try it?
Read more here…. thenearsightedmonkey:

Dear Students,
This just in from sharp-eyed Smiley Bone.
In 1947, ten cartoonists drew their characters blind-folded. Can you dig it? Wanna try it?
Read more here…. thenearsightedmonkey:

Dear Students,
This just in from sharp-eyed Smiley Bone.
In 1947, ten cartoonists drew their characters blind-folded. Can you dig it? Wanna try it?
Read more here…. thenearsightedmonkey:

Dear Students,
This just in from sharp-eyed Smiley Bone.
In 1947, ten cartoonists drew their characters blind-folded. Can you dig it? Wanna try it?
Read more here…. thenearsightedmonkey:

Dear Students,
This just in from sharp-eyed Smiley Bone.
In 1947, ten cartoonists drew their characters blind-folded. Can you dig it? Wanna try it?
Read more here…. thenearsightedmonkey:

Dear Students,
This just in from sharp-eyed Smiley Bone.
In 1947, ten cartoonists drew their characters blind-folded. Can you dig it? Wanna try it?
Read more here…. thenearsightedmonkey:

Dear Students,
This just in from sharp-eyed Smiley Bone.
In 1947, ten cartoonists drew their characters blind-folded. Can you dig it? Wanna try it?
Read more here…. thenearsightedmonkey:

Dear Students,
This just in from sharp-eyed Smiley Bone.
In 1947, ten cartoonists drew their characters blind-folded. Can you dig it? Wanna try it?
Read more here….

thenearsightedmonkey:

Dear Students,

This just in from sharp-eyed Smiley Bone.

In 1947, ten cartoonists drew their characters blind-folded. Can you dig it? Wanna try it?

Read more here….

austinkleon:

How to draw a bear thinking about something

Filed under: jon klassen austinkleon:

How to draw a bear thinking about something

Filed under: jon klassen austinkleon:

How to draw a bear thinking about something

Filed under: jon klassen

humansofnewyork:

"I want to be a visual artist, but the art world seems to be much more about politics than it is about talent. You have to continually go to galleries and events, so that you can shake the right hands and meet influential people. Extroverted artists seem to have a big advantage."

(Mexico City, Mexico)

teethingontigers:

"When I first picked up Neil Gaiman’s Coraline (2002) in the Young Adult section of my local library, I remember thinking to myself, “This will be a very frightening book.” This thought excited me, as it often does around that teen-age when you begin to actively seek out the things that frighten you. Coraline seemed to me a darker retelling of Lewis Carroll’s Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland, with the perfect balance of whimsy and darkness only Gaiman can execute so effortlessly. I have never thought of Coraline as a young-adult novel, because Coraline, like so many of her YA protagonist counterparts, must face challenges that would defeat most adults. Though she is a young child, Coraline is far more mature and self-aware than most of the adults in the novel, and yet she’s still able to bring joy and silliness to the most horrifying of situations. Within the twisted, fantastical world of the Other Mother, Coraline is given the option of remaining within the dreamscape, constantly refabricated to suit Coraline’s desires and dreams—she can remain, as it were, in the rabbit hole. At a price, that is. Yet Coraline chooses not to be blinded by her own selfish desires, no matter how fluorescent and enamoring they may be. She cares too deeply about her parents, and the other children that have been exploited by the Other Mother, and her friend the Cat. She even possesses sympathy for the Other Father, an amorphous phantasm of her father the Other Mother discards once he’s served his purpose. At the climax of the story, when Coraline has the option to end the nightmarish pursuit of the Other Mother and give into the fantasy, Coraline sagely remarks, “‘I don’t want whatever I want. Nobody does. Not really. What kind of fun would it be if I just got everything I ever wanted, just like that, and it didn’t mean anything? What then?’” (Gaiman 2002). It’s a simple sentiment the book slowly builds around, one that resonates with life-long ethics of gratitude, hard work and not expecting that the world necessarily owes you something.

Coraline also has one of the most profound passages about bravery that I’ve ever read. She tells the Cat a story about when she and her father went exploring in an old rubbish dump and accidentally stumble across a wasp’s nest. Coraline’s father scoops her up and carries her to safety, though he gets stung by many wasps in the process. During the escape, her father loses his glasses and has to return to the wasp’s nest to retrieve them. Coraline says, “’It wasn’t brave because he wasn’t scared: it was the only thing he could do. But going back again to get his glasses, when he knew the wasps were there, when he was really scared. That was brave.’ ‘Because,’ she said, ‘when you’re scared but you still do it anyway, that’s brave” (Gaiman 2002). Being fearless doesn’t make you brave, but rather acknowledging the fear and not letting it own you demonstrates courage. As a reader, the novel is truly terrifying, for the trials that Coraline has to undergo are the stuff of nightmares. Even after it seems that Coraline has escaped the clutches of the Other Mother and saved the souls of the forgotten children, she is still called upon to be brave, though no one within her own world understands or acknowledges her courage. The invisible acts of bravery and charity our lives are built around.

Coraline remains one of my favorite books, enduring for its charm, sly sense of humor and candor about the night-side of life. The frightening elements of Coraline are what make it so mesmerizing, as they teach us how misunderstood the darkness truly is and how much we can cope with and overcome. As Gaiman prefaces the book, dragons, darkness, violence and fear are all very real and necessary parts of our world, whether adult or otherwise. But dragons can also be vanquished, doors closed on the scuttling, malicious things that populate our nightmares and waking reality. That is a lesson worth learning, and one I continue to learn every day since I first finished the book.”

(via neil-gaiman)

“I don’t consider the books to be anti-authoritarian. But I do think it is important, if you think something is wrong, to question authority — because, you know, there are villains in real life, and they don’t always wear black capes and black hats. Sometimes they’re dressed like authority figures. And kids need to know that it’s important to question them.”
— Author Dav Pikley’s reaction to Captain Underpants earning the number one spot as the most frequently challenged book in America. The book has topped the most challenged books list for two years now. (via npr)

explore-blog:

Wonderful children’s book on space exploration tickles our zest for the cosmos – rocket fuel for the souls of budding Sagans 

instagram:

The Daily Diary of a Sketchbook Artist

To see more photos of Anna’s notebook sketches, follow @sally_mao on Instagram.

“The absolute truth appears in your drawing when you have no chance to change it,” says Moscow-based Instagrammer Anna Rastorgueva (@sally_mao), who creates an exquisite daily diary using only felt-tip markers. She takes inspiration from the detailed illustrations of botany and zoology books, a lifelong love of hers. “When I read ‘Brehm’s Life of Animals,’ I dreamed of meeting all the heroes from the pages of his book,” she explains. Anna draws anywhere, whether standing among thousands of people at a concert or even at a nude beach. For her, drawing is her personal space. “When I draw, I can dive deep into the moment and emotions. As Salvador Dalí said, ‘Drawing is the honesty of the art. There is no possibility of cheating. It is either good or bad.’” instagram:

The Daily Diary of a Sketchbook Artist

To see more photos of Anna’s notebook sketches, follow @sally_mao on Instagram.

“The absolute truth appears in your drawing when you have no chance to change it,” says Moscow-based Instagrammer Anna Rastorgueva (@sally_mao), who creates an exquisite daily diary using only felt-tip markers. She takes inspiration from the detailed illustrations of botany and zoology books, a lifelong love of hers. “When I read ‘Brehm’s Life of Animals,’ I dreamed of meeting all the heroes from the pages of his book,” she explains. Anna draws anywhere, whether standing among thousands of people at a concert or even at a nude beach. For her, drawing is her personal space. “When I draw, I can dive deep into the moment and emotions. As Salvador Dalí said, ‘Drawing is the honesty of the art. There is no possibility of cheating. It is either good or bad.’” instagram:

The Daily Diary of a Sketchbook Artist

To see more photos of Anna’s notebook sketches, follow @sally_mao on Instagram.

“The absolute truth appears in your drawing when you have no chance to change it,” says Moscow-based Instagrammer Anna Rastorgueva (@sally_mao), who creates an exquisite daily diary using only felt-tip markers. She takes inspiration from the detailed illustrations of botany and zoology books, a lifelong love of hers. “When I read ‘Brehm’s Life of Animals,’ I dreamed of meeting all the heroes from the pages of his book,” she explains. Anna draws anywhere, whether standing among thousands of people at a concert or even at a nude beach. For her, drawing is her personal space. “When I draw, I can dive deep into the moment and emotions. As Salvador Dalí said, ‘Drawing is the honesty of the art. There is no possibility of cheating. It is either good or bad.’” instagram:

The Daily Diary of a Sketchbook Artist

To see more photos of Anna’s notebook sketches, follow @sally_mao on Instagram.

“The absolute truth appears in your drawing when you have no chance to change it,” says Moscow-based Instagrammer Anna Rastorgueva (@sally_mao), who creates an exquisite daily diary using only felt-tip markers. She takes inspiration from the detailed illustrations of botany and zoology books, a lifelong love of hers. “When I read ‘Brehm’s Life of Animals,’ I dreamed of meeting all the heroes from the pages of his book,” she explains. Anna draws anywhere, whether standing among thousands of people at a concert or even at a nude beach. For her, drawing is her personal space. “When I draw, I can dive deep into the moment and emotions. As Salvador Dalí said, ‘Drawing is the honesty of the art. There is no possibility of cheating. It is either good or bad.’” instagram:

The Daily Diary of a Sketchbook Artist

To see more photos of Anna’s notebook sketches, follow @sally_mao on Instagram.

“The absolute truth appears in your drawing when you have no chance to change it,” says Moscow-based Instagrammer Anna Rastorgueva (@sally_mao), who creates an exquisite daily diary using only felt-tip markers. She takes inspiration from the detailed illustrations of botany and zoology books, a lifelong love of hers. “When I read ‘Brehm’s Life of Animals,’ I dreamed of meeting all the heroes from the pages of his book,” she explains. Anna draws anywhere, whether standing among thousands of people at a concert or even at a nude beach. For her, drawing is her personal space. “When I draw, I can dive deep into the moment and emotions. As Salvador Dalí said, ‘Drawing is the honesty of the art. There is no possibility of cheating. It is either good or bad.’” instagram:

The Daily Diary of a Sketchbook Artist

To see more photos of Anna’s notebook sketches, follow @sally_mao on Instagram.

“The absolute truth appears in your drawing when you have no chance to change it,” says Moscow-based Instagrammer Anna Rastorgueva (@sally_mao), who creates an exquisite daily diary using only felt-tip markers. She takes inspiration from the detailed illustrations of botany and zoology books, a lifelong love of hers. “When I read ‘Brehm’s Life of Animals,’ I dreamed of meeting all the heroes from the pages of his book,” she explains. Anna draws anywhere, whether standing among thousands of people at a concert or even at a nude beach. For her, drawing is her personal space. “When I draw, I can dive deep into the moment and emotions. As Salvador Dalí said, ‘Drawing is the honesty of the art. There is no possibility of cheating. It is either good or bad.’” instagram:

The Daily Diary of a Sketchbook Artist

To see more photos of Anna’s notebook sketches, follow @sally_mao on Instagram.

“The absolute truth appears in your drawing when you have no chance to change it,” says Moscow-based Instagrammer Anna Rastorgueva (@sally_mao), who creates an exquisite daily diary using only felt-tip markers. She takes inspiration from the detailed illustrations of botany and zoology books, a lifelong love of hers. “When I read ‘Brehm’s Life of Animals,’ I dreamed of meeting all the heroes from the pages of his book,” she explains. Anna draws anywhere, whether standing among thousands of people at a concert or even at a nude beach. For her, drawing is her personal space. “When I draw, I can dive deep into the moment and emotions. As Salvador Dalí said, ‘Drawing is the honesty of the art. There is no possibility of cheating. It is either good or bad.’”

instagram:

The Daily Diary of a Sketchbook Artist

To see more photos of Anna’s notebook sketches, follow @sally_mao on Instagram.

“The absolute truth appears in your drawing when you have no chance to change it,” says Moscow-based Instagrammer Anna Rastorgueva (@sally_mao), who creates an exquisite daily diary using only felt-tip markers. She takes inspiration from the detailed illustrations of botany and zoology books, a lifelong love of hers. “When I read ‘Brehm’s Life of Animals,’ I dreamed of meeting all the heroes from the pages of his book,” she explains. Anna draws anywhere, whether standing among thousands of people at a concert or even at a nude beach. For her, drawing is her personal space. “When I draw, I can dive deep into the moment and emotions. As Salvador Dalí said, ‘Drawing is the honesty of the art. There is no possibility of cheating. It is either good or bad.’”

rediscoveredbooks:

Banned Books Week starts tomorrow! Here to kick it off is Rediscovered Books co-owner & bookseller Bruce DeLaney reads from “Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone” by J.K. Rowling.

The series was the number one banned book in the last decade. Many have argued that the themes of witchcraft and sorcery are anti-Christian, detrimental to children, and “…are door-openers to topics that desensitize children to very real evils in the world.”

Everyone should have the right to read freely and without censorship. 

Buy it online now 

For more history on the banned series click here & here 

_______________

More information about Banned Books Week 

Books banned or challenged THIS year

Frequently challenged books