explore-blog:

New study looks at what children’s drawings at age 4 reveal about their future thinking skills:

Researchers from King’s College London enlisted 7,700 pairs of 4-year-old identical and fraternal twins in England to draw pictures of a child. The researchers scored each drawing on a scale of 0 to 12, based on how many body parts were included. All the kids also took verbal and nonverbal intelligence tests at 4 and 14.

Kids with higher drawing scores tended to do better on the intelligence tests, though the two were only moderately linked.

Of course, one major limitation is that the study seems to conflate accuracy with intelligence, an approach that reflects our culture’s persistently narrow definition of intelligence and a failure to account for all the other realms of ability in Howard Gardner’s pioneering Theory of Multiple Intelligences. Perhaps kids who are less accurate but display a higher degree of abstract thought would end up more gifted in fields rely on symbolism and metaphorical thinking, from writing to painting. 

Granted, the researchers seem to be aware of this shortcoming. NPR reports:

[The researchers] are trying to figure out whether judging the children’s art in some other way (maybe based on creativity instead of accuracy) would reveal something different about their intelligence.

creativemornings:

"I think if a business doesn’t have a higher purpose than making money, it doesn’t really have a right to be a business."

— Steve Beauchesne. Watch the talk.

creativemornings:

How can you not fall in love with these wallpaper designs by Oliver Jeffers. creativemornings:

How can you not fall in love with these wallpaper designs by Oliver Jeffers. creativemornings:

How can you not fall in love with these wallpaper designs by Oliver Jeffers.
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thenearsightedmonkey:

HOW HANDWRITING BOOSTS THE BRAIN

SOURCE: The Wall Street Journal

Other research highlights the hand’s unique relationship with the brain when it comes to composing thoughts and ideas. Virginia Berninger, a professor of educational psychology at the University of Washington, says handwriting differs from typing because it requires executing sequential strokes to form a letter, whereas keyboarding involves selecting a whole letter by touching a key.

She says pictures of the brain have illustrated that sequential finger movements activated massive regions involved in thinking, language and working memory—the system for temporarily storing and managing information.

And one recent study of hers demonstrated that in grades two, four and six, children wrote more words, faster, and expressed more ideas when writing essays by hand versus with a keyboard.

Continue reading….

(via thenearsightedmonkey)

nprbooks:

mashable:

Magical Harry Potter Cocktails to Charm Your Palate
It’s yer birthday, ‘Arry. Celebrate with these Harry Potter-themed cocktails.

These are soooo yummy looking!  I could totally go for a cold Ravenclaw House right now. But then, I always did fancy myself a Ravenclaw.
— Petra nprbooks:

mashable:

Magical Harry Potter Cocktails to Charm Your Palate
It’s yer birthday, ‘Arry. Celebrate with these Harry Potter-themed cocktails.

These are soooo yummy looking!  I could totally go for a cold Ravenclaw House right now. But then, I always did fancy myself a Ravenclaw.
— Petra nprbooks:

mashable:

Magical Harry Potter Cocktails to Charm Your Palate
It’s yer birthday, ‘Arry. Celebrate with these Harry Potter-themed cocktails.

These are soooo yummy looking!  I could totally go for a cold Ravenclaw House right now. But then, I always did fancy myself a Ravenclaw.
— Petra nprbooks:

mashable:

Magical Harry Potter Cocktails to Charm Your Palate
It’s yer birthday, ‘Arry. Celebrate with these Harry Potter-themed cocktails.

These are soooo yummy looking!  I could totally go for a cold Ravenclaw House right now. But then, I always did fancy myself a Ravenclaw.
— Petra

nprbooks:

mashable:

Magical Harry Potter Cocktails to Charm Your Palate

It’s yer birthday, ‘Arry. Celebrate with these Harry Potter-themed cocktails.

These are soooo yummy looking!  I could totally go for a cold Ravenclaw House right now. But then, I always did fancy myself a Ravenclaw.

— Petra

hugtherobots:

I know it’s trendy to fight the system and cry that we are all becoming slaves of technology, but this attitude overlooks that computers and phones are tools for communicating. When someone thinks I’m an idiot smiling at a machine, I’m actually smiling at my girlfriend who is 10000 miles away and whom I would have never met if not for these newfangled electronics. As they say: when the wise man points to the moon, the fool looks at the finger.

This is a topic that I’ve been wanting to tackle for a while now; much credit to this excellent post for bringing it to the front of my brain.

(via themarysue)

“It’s OK not to be a genius, whatever that is, if there even is such a thing…the creative life may or may not be the apex of human civilization, but either way it’s not what I thought it was. It doesn’t make you special and sparkly. You don’t have to walk alone. You can work in an office — I’ve worked in offices for the past 15 years and written five novels while doing it. The creative life is forgiving: You can betray it all you want, again and again, and no matter how many times you do, it will always take you back.”
Lev Grossman manages to smash “you don’t have to be a genius” and “keep your day job” into his great essay, "How Not to Write a Novel" (his book, The Magician’s Land, is out this week)

(via austinkleon)